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Wang Dan, November 4, 2019 In 1989, during the Chinese pro-democracy movement, 20-year-old Peking University student Wang Dan (王丹) became one of the most influential student leaders. Following the outbreak of the Tiananmen Massacre, he found himself at the top of the lists of 21 wanted criminals. He was arrested and sentenced to four years in prison on the charge of engaging in “counter-revolutionary propaganda and incitement.” After he was released in 1993, he was again arrested in 1995 for continuing to engage in the underground resistance. This time, he was charged with “conspiracy to overthrow the state” and given a prison term of 11 years. In 1998, on the eve of U.S. President Clinton’s visit to China, Wang Dan became a geopolitical bargaining chip. […]
China Change Interviews - a view from the ground in an era of change
Reports
Analysis and Opinions
  • Zhang Lifan: The CCP’s Hardline Measures Could Be Its Undoing

    Zhang Lifan: The CCP’s Hardline Measures Could Be Its Undoing

    Zhang Lifan, November 2, 2019 This is a translation of Beijing-based historian Zhang Lifan’s interview by Deutsche Welle’s Chinese Service. In the interview, Zhang Lifan (章立凡) gives his views on the recently concluded Fourth Plenum of the Chinese Communist Party’s 19th Central Committee, as well as the overall direction of the Chinese regime. DW: Could you briefly analyze the main …
  • China’s Official GDP Growth Rate Does Not Agree With Reality

    China’s Official GDP Growth Rate Does Not Agree With Reality

    Xiang Songzuo, October 23, 2019 Xiang Songzuo (向松祚) is an economist, and a professor of the School of Finance and Finance of Renmin University of China. His speech in December 2018, A Great Shift Unseen Over the Last Forty Years, translated by China Change, was widely disseminated. This short, recent commentary below was immediately censored on Weibo and WeChat.  — …
  • I’m a Hongkonger — A New Cold War Has Begun

    I’m a Hongkonger — A New Cold War Has Begun

    Liao Yiwu, September 30, 2019 On August 11, 2019, a nurse during a demonstration against the extradition bill in Tsim Sha Tsui district in Hong Kong, had her right eye blown out by a beanbag fired by a police officer, causing lifelong disability and instantly provoking explosive public outrage. Many people regarded this incident as the start of a “Hong …
  • In China’s 70th Anniversary Grand Pardon, Read the Small Print and Do Your Math

    In China’s 70th Anniversary Grand Pardon, Read the Small Print and Do Your Math

    Peter Humphrey, September 30, 2019 Bogged down by a trade war with America, unrest in Hong Kong, a slowing economy and a surge of ill will across the planet, the People’s Republic of China is approaching its 70th anniversary on the back foot, and keen to stir some favourable sentiment. At home, in the run-up to the celebrations, its ruler …
Interviews and profiles
  • Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview With Lü Pin (Part 3 of 3)

    Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview With Lü Pin (Part 3 of 3)

    In the final part of her interview, Lü Pin discusses the Feminist Five case, how the #MeToo movement caught on in China at a time when the feminist movement seemed to be fading, and the eventual shutdown of Feminist Voice. According to Lü Pin, while the feminist movement is facing an uncertain future, the repressive regime is far from claiming …
  • Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part 2 of 3)

    Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part 2 of 3)

    After leaving China Women News, Lü Pin began to work with women intellectuals pioneering women’s rights advocacy in the 1990s and 2000s. In 2009, Lü Pin founded ‘Feminist Voice.' Its sharp interpretation of women issues through a feminist lens attracted many young educated women. A small NGO called ‘One-yuan Commune’ was established in Beijing that quickly became a springboard for …
  • Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part One of Three)

    Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part One of Three)

    Since the 1990s, Lü Pin has been a pioneering advocate for women’s rights in China as well as a prolific writer on gender issues and a mentor to a group of activists known as the “young feminist activists.” In part one of our 3-part interview of her, Lü Pin traces her upbringing, the 1989 movement, her journalism career at China …
  • Li Hai’s List

    Li Hai’s List

    Between 1991 to 1994, Li Hai, a graduate student of philosophy at Peking University, compiled a list of 522 "June 4th Rioters” — Beijing residents who had been severely punished for their participation in the 1989 democracy movement. The list was published by Human Rights in China and Human Rights Watch in 1994. From 1995 to 2004, Li Hai was …
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