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Free Ding Jiaxi!
Luo Shengchun, Emrys Westacott, May 8, 2020 In the small town of Alfred, upstate New York, the secret detention of Chinese lawyer and civil rights activist Ding Jiaxi (丁家喜) has concerned the locals and spurred their desire to help rescue him. Alfred University professor of philosophy Emrys Westacott recently spoke to Ding Jiaxi’s wife, Alfr [...] Keep reading »
Ten Years Disbarred
Tang Jitian, April 30, 2020 Tang Jitian (唐吉田) grew up in the mountains of the northeastern province of Jilin, a Korean autonomous prefecture, not too far from Vladivostok in Russia’s Far East, and North Korea. He enrolled in the Politics Department at Northeast Normal University in Changchun in 1988, just in time for the 1989 student de [...] Keep reading »
China Change Academics Around the World Write to Xi Jinping: Give Freedom of Speech Back to the Chinese People
February 22, 2020 This open letter was initiated by professors Andrew Nathan, Perry Link, and Zhang Lun. Please join them, as many of their colleagues have done, to sign this letter. Please send your name and affiliation to: chinacitizenmovement@gmail.com. The list of signatories will be updated daily. The Chinese version of this letter can be foun [...] Keep reading »
The Right to Freedom of Speech Starts Today — An Open Letter to the National People’s Congress and the NPC Standing Committee
Lu Nan (鲁难), Wu Xiaojun (吴小军), Qin Wei (秦渭), Tian Zhongxun (田仲勋), Zhang Qianfan (张千帆), Xu Zhangrun (许章润), Xiao Shu (笑蜀), Guo Feixiong (郭飞雄), Wang Xichuan (王西川), February 7, 2020 On February 6, 2020, Dr. Li Wenliang (李文亮), the 2019-nConV whistle blower, died in the midst of epidemic in Wuhan. He [...] Keep reading »
Going Around Coronavirus-Stricken Wuhan With Fang Bin, Visiting Hospitals, and Being Visited by Police, on February 1, 2020
China Change, February 3, 2020 Fang Bin (方斌) is a middle-aged man and a Wuhan native. His friends told China Change that he used to run an interior design business in Beijing, but moved back to Wuhan some time ago and started a garment business specializing in “Han clothes” (汉服), but it’s going pretty badly. When the lockdown on the c [...] Keep reading »
The Aftermath of a Gathering: Arrest, Flight, Hiding, and Family Separation
Yaxue Cao, January 27, 2020 Last month, on December 7 and 8, around 20 Chinese men and women from around the country gathered in the southeastern city of Xiamen. Among them were lawyers and those of other professions. They met in a private home, discussing current events and policy, public affairs, and China’s political trajectory. They shared th [...] Keep reading »
Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview With Lü Pin (Part 3 of 3)
In the final part of her interview, Lü Pin discusses the Feminist Five case, how the #MeToo movement caught on in China at a time when the feminist movement seemed to be fading, and the eventual shutdown of Feminist Voice. According to Lü Pin, while the feminist movement is facing an uncertain future, the repressive regime is far from claiming vi [...] Keep reading »
Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part 2 of 3)
After leaving China Women News, Lü Pin began to work with women intellectuals pioneering women’s rights advocacy in the 1990s and 2000s. In 2009, Lü Pin founded ‘Feminist Voice.' Its sharp interpretation of women issues through a feminist lens attracted many young educated women. A small NGO called ‘One-yuan Commune’ was established in Be [...] Keep reading »
Feminism and Social Change in China: an Interview with Lü Pin (Part One of Three)
Since the 1990s, Lü Pin has been a pioneering advocate for women’s rights in China as well as a prolific writer on gender issues and a mentor to a group of activists known as the “young feminist activists.” In part one of our 3-part interview of her, Lü Pin traces her upbringing, the 1989 movement, her journalism career at China Women’s N [...] Keep reading »
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