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Political Transition
The Citizens Movement
By Xu Zhiyong, translated by Andréa Worden, June 21, 2022 After being released from prison in July 2017, Xu Zhiyong devoted a year to writing “A Beautiful China” that was posted on his blog. This is Chapter 13 of the book. Xu’s career as a civil rights leader has spanned two decades since the early 2000s. He was imprisoned from 2013 to2017. [...] Keep reading »
The Spring Breeze Is Bound to Cause Ripples: A New Year Statement by The China Human Rights Lawyers Group
January 1, 2022 In 1925, the 26-year-old poet and political dissident Wen Yiduo (闻一多) wrote in his poem titled “Dead Water”: Here is a ditch of doomed, dead waterNo spring breeze can stir up even half a ripple In 1946, Wen was assassinated on the streets of Kunming by military security officers of the Kuomintang that ruled China at the ti [...] Keep reading »
From a Successful Lawyer to a Civil Rights Activist — An Exclusive Interview With Ding Jiaxi
March 19, 2020 Ding Jiaxi (丁家喜) was reluctant when I asked for an interview. It was in the fall of 2017, a year after he was released from prison as a leader of the New Citizens Movement. He was visiting his wife and two daughters in Alfred, a village of 5,000 souls in Upstate New York, and would go back to China in a few days. He didn’t wa [...] Keep reading »
Change — A 2020 New Year’s Message
Xu Zhiyong, January 1, 2020 This is the New Year’s message from a civil society leader who is, at this very moment, on the run to elude arrest by the Chinese authorities. A report on this new and ongoing wave of crackdown is forthcoming. — The Editors Enter 2020 in the march of history: another wave of crackdown against civil society is sweepin [...] Keep reading »
As Violence in Hong Kong Escalates, the Victim-Blamers Are Coming Out of the Woodwork
Chang Ping, November 15, 2019 Everyone knows that if the Hong Kong government and Beijing cannot offer an affirmative response to the protesters’ demands, and if the abuse of power by the police does not end, the conflicts will only escalate and result in more violence. However, the authorities are with full knowledge allowing Hong Kong to turn i [...] Keep reading »
Wang Dan: The Cold War Has Not Ended
Wang Dan, November 4, 2019 In 1989, during the Chinese pro-democracy movement, 20-year-old Peking University student Wang Dan (王丹) became one of the most influential student leaders. Following the outbreak of the Tiananmen Massacre, he found himself at the top of the lists of 21 wanted criminals. He was arrested and sentenced to four years in p [...] Keep reading »
Proposing a Chinese Day of Fast
Citizens Movement in China, June 2, 2019 In the hearts of millions of people, there is a collective memory that has been suppressed for 30 years. How to awaken this memory, and confront our nation’s historical wounds? How to exorcise the haze of authoritarianism that has plagued this great land for millenia past? How to break out from the totalit [...] Keep reading »
A Place for the Liu Xiaobo Bust
Yaxue Cao, April 16, 2019 In August 1988, two months after receiving his PhD in literature from the Beijing Normal University, Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) left the Chinese capital for a series of academic visits across Europe and the United States. The first place he went to was University of Oslo in Norway. A few months later, he visited University of [...] Keep reading »
The Lesson of Venezuela: Regime Change Can Only Happen When People Take to the Streets
Wang Dan, February 5, 2019 On February 2, tens of thousands of Venezuelans took to the streets again, demanding change. This article by 1989 Tiananmen student leader Wang Dan (王丹) was published in Chinese by Radio Free Asia on January 25. After teaching in Taiwan for years, Wang Dan now lives in the Washington, DC area and heads the new Dialogu [...] Keep reading »
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