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Wu Gan’s Pretrial Statement

Wu Gan, August 9, 2017

 

Wu Gan (吴淦), arguably the most celebrated activist in recent years in China’s struggle for justice and human rights, and a seminal user of online mobilization and peaceful direct action, was the first detainee of what has come to be known as the 709 Crackdown. Wu Gan became known for his role in mobilizing public support in the Deng Yujiao case (邓玉娇案) in 2009, and in the years following was involved in countless cases, both large and small. He became well known for his audacity and creativity. He also wrote three guides for potential activists and petitioners: Guide to Butchering Pigs (《杀猪宝典》) , Guide to Drinking Tea (《喝茶宝典》) and Guide to Petitioners Fighting Against Forced Demolition of Homes (《访民杀猪宝典》). Wu Gan was detained on May 19, 2015, as he was demonstrating outside Jiangxi Superior Court, which had recently denied lawyers their right to access the case files of four wrongfully sentenced death row inmates. Like the rest of the 709 detainees, he was placed under “residential surveillance at a designated place,” China’s euphemism for secret detention, and tortured. On December 23, 2016, Wu Gan was indicted. The prosecutors listed 12 crimes (which to everyone else read like a list of heroic deeds), and concluded that “defendant Wu Gan organized, plotted, and implemented the crime of subverting state power and overturning the socialist system.” One of the two 709 detainees still remaining in custody for refusing to compromise (the other being lawyer Wang Quanzhang), Wu Gan will tried on Monday, August 14, at Tianjin Second Intermediate Court. Below is a statement Wu Gan issued recently, published by his lawyers. The court says the trial will be held in secret because some elements of the trial involve “state secrets.”  — The Editors

 

Wu Gan_开庭前声明

 

The rights of free speech, press, religious belief, demonstration, assembly, supervising the government and officials, as well as expressing discontent are all natural rights and civil rights endowed and guaranteed by the constitution (presuming the rights are not in name only). They are also universal values recognized and adhered to by countries around the world. If a citizen is convicted of a crime for exercising these rights, it’s a disgrace to our country and will be ridiculed and spurned by the people of the world. Forcing someone to defend himself against a charge of guilt for exercising these rights is an insult.

In mainland China, if your ideology and beliefs are at odds with those favored by the authorities, you’re apt to be framed with a criminal charge. Since the Communist Party came to power in 1949, millions of people have been persecuted. During Mao’s Cultural Revolution and all other political movements, intellectuals, the 1989 generation, democracy party members, and Falun Gong practitioners have all been retaliated against for defending their legitimate rights. Which of them is a criminal? For decades political changes in China have been in form and not content, while the essence of the authoritarian system has remained unchanged.

Their accusations against me are now public knowledge. I’ve done nothing more than make some speeches, write three books, give moral support and assistance to innocent victims of injustice, expose the misconduct and criminal actions of the government and officials, and express my ideas through performance art. All this is simply exercising my legitimate rights as a citizen. These civil rights should be defended by all of us.

I will be convicted not because I am really guilty, but because of my refusal to accept a state-designated lawyer, plead guilty, and make a televised confession for their propaganda purposes, and my resolution to reveal their brutal torture of me and the procuratorates’ misconduct. The special investigative team told me that my case would be decided by leadership on higher level, and that my trial is just a ritual carried out by the procuratorate and court. Although I know that this trial is only a farce to declare me guilty, I will not speak in my defense. An innocent person does not need to defend himself.

It doesn’t make sense to have a trial before many illegal acts against me are investigated and resolved. These misdeeds include: illegal police procedures, their brutal torture of me, occupation of my property, and forcing me to accept media interviews and give up the right to engage my own lawyer.

I know I will receive a heavy sentence, but I will never regret what I have done. I do feel guilty for involving my family in my case, and for having done so little for them. The sympathy and support of the public, and the dedication of my lawyers is my best “verdict.” Black and white, right and wrong will not be reversed forever, and justice will eventually prevail. The wheel of history rolls forward and can’t be stopped by anyone. Those who try to block the progress of human civilization will in the end find their place in history’s Hall of Shame.

Under the brutal rule of  the “Great, Glorious, and Correct” Communist Party of China, it would be embarrassing if I wasn’t framed as a “criminal.” Life is short, so we’d better “commit our crimes” while we’ve still got the chance. My crime of subverting the Communist regime is a great honor for me. In fighting for democracy and freedom and in defense of civil rights, a guilty verdict issued by a dictatorial regime is a golden glittering trophy awarded to warriors for liberty and democracy.

I refuse to speak in defense of myself, but I take this opportunity to thank you for the award! Thank you!

 

Statement by Wu Gan

2017

 


Related:

The Twelve ‘Crimes’ of Wu Gan the Butcher, August 13, 2017.

Wu Gan the Butcher, a profile by Yaqiu Wang, July, 2015.

Bill of Indictment Against Rights Activist Wu Gan, January 12, 2017.

Activist Who Rejected TV Confession Invites CCTV Interviewer to Be Witness at His Trial, Wu Gan, March 24, 2017.

To All Friends Concerned With the Imprisoned Human Rights Activist Wu Gan and the 709 Case, Xu Xiaoshun, father of Wu Gan, May 22, 2017.

Paying Homage to Liu Xiaobo from Behind Bars, Wu Gan, July 31, 2017.

 

Translated from Chinese by China Change.

 

 

 


28 Comments

  1. All countries in the world should stop trading with China until they stop these terrible human rights practices.

  2. dclarke2017 says:

    Instead of “would be decided by city officials”, the translation should be “had been decided by the leadership”. There’s nothing there about which level of leadership (city, province, center).
    –Don Clarke

  3. […] and guaranteed by the constitution (presuming the rights are not in name only),” Wu Gan wrote in My Pretrial Statement. “If a citizen is convicted of a crime for exercising these rights, it’s a disgrace to our […]

  4. […] Profile—and Now He’s in Trouble – WSJ In his Aug. 9 statement [translated into English here], Mr. Wu said he won’t defend himself at his trial—which he calls a farce—and claims he was […]

  5. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

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  8. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  9. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  10. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  11. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

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  13. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  14. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  15. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  16. […] we do know one thing of Wu Gan’s personal emotions about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one in every of his […]

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  19. […] we do know one thing of Wu Gan’s personal emotions about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one among his legal […]

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  21. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  22. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

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  25. […] we do know something of Wu Gan’s own feelings about his trial, recorded in a pre-trial statement smuggled out by one of his […]

  26. […] My Pretrial Statement, Wu Gan, August 9, 2017. […]

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